Animation and Games Computer Design to Build Awareness of Energy Conservation

London Journal of Research in Computer Science and Technology
Volume | Issue | Compilation
Authored by Joop Jang , Ratthasak Phommas, Tika Bunnang
Classification: H.5.2
Keywords: energy conservation; awareness; repeat; animation; games computer.
Language: English

This research is to design of animation and games computer to build awareness energy conservation tools, these are one of the ways that contribute to the conservation of energy because the main reason for the problems today is that people are not sufficiently aware of the need to conserve energy. Therefore, the solution to the sustainable energy question lies in educating people so that they will become much more aware of energy conservation issues. The promotion of energy conservation would seek to change people’s behavior the age of 7-12 years old; the process of education should be used to teach people about the importance of sustainability in energy, hereby developing eco-friendly human behavior.

               

Animation and Games Computer Design to Build Awareness of Energy Conservation

Chavipa Phongthanachoteα, Ratthasak Phommasσ & Tika Bunnangρ

____________________________________________

ABSTRACT

This research is to design of animation and games computer to build awareness energy conservation tools, these are one of the ways that contribute to the conservation of energy because the main reason for the problems today is that people are not sufficiently aware of the need to conserve energy. Therefore, the solution to the sustainable energy question lies in educating people so that they will become much more aware of energy conservation issues. The promotion of energy conservation would seek to change people’s behavior the age of 7-12 years old; the process of education should be used to teach people about the importance of sustainability in energy, hereby developing eco-friendly human behavior.

Keywords: energy conservation; awareness; repeat; animation; games computer.

Author α σ: Rattanakosin College for Sustainable Energy and Environment (RCSEE), Rajamangala University of Technology Rattanakosin, 96 m 3 Puthamonthon Sai 5, Salaya, Puthamonthon, Nakhon Pathom, 73170, Thailand.

Author ρ: Integrated Solution 98 Co., Ltd. 998 /27 On-Nuch 30-32 Sukhumvit 77 Rd, Suanluang, Bangkok, 10230.

  1. INTRODUCTION

Education is the best way to build awareness, so students, their families, and their teachers, must all be made aware of the need to consume energy in a sustainable manner. Training in sustainable energy use and the economic use of energy must begin from the elementary educational grades, when children first begin their compulsory education. When good habits are instilled in young children, it is very difficult to change these habits at a later age, and this is why it is so important to provide energy education at an early age, to build long-lasting patterns of responsible behavior. Given that the conservation of energy is such a vital topic, it is essential that education in saving energy is provided at every grade level, especially in Europe where the high demand for energy makes conservation critical. The review of the literature showed that there have been many projects which have focused on the efficient use of energy and schemes to save energy (Mumma et al., 1966; Rowland, 1980; Sarvis, 1980; Wenig, 1981; Theiss, 1982; Crelinsen, 1983; Nicholson, 1996; Newson, 1997; Kirchhoff, 2001; Hjeresen et al., 2002; Papadouris, Constantinou & Kyratsi, 2008).

Awareness means an expression of feeling, opinion, and recognition, such as the condition in which a person understands and assesses situations based on their own experience by referring to a period of time, an event, or an experience from the environment as the factors that lead people towards awareness (Turner, 2008). According to the meaning of awareness as above, awareness refers to feelings in the mind, realizing the responsibility for the problem by evaluation and realizing the importance of their own actions which influence the situation. In this regard, awareness has degrees of relativity, since one can be partially aware, subconsciously aware, or wholly unaware of a situation or problem. Furthermore, one’s awareness might be based on internal feelings, or on external events which are understood via the senses.

  1. MEASUREMENT OF ENERGY AWARENESS

The concept of awareness measurement requires behavior to be measured in such a manner that can show the cognition of the students with regard to the existence of the phenomenon or some entity. Awareness is strongly related to intelligence. An awareness of something or someone is a form of knowing that a thing or a person exists, although it is a superficial recognition (Choong Weng Wai, 2009). In addition, Krathwohl also said of the extent of awareness that it is important to note that the range of awareness appears sequentially from the end of the superficial or cursory awareness to profound gratitude and deliberation. In the context of the teaching of art, an example of cursory awareness is the recognition by realization that there is a painting which has never been realized like that before. Accordingly, this paper follows this conceptual model as follows figure 1:

Figure 1: Conceptual model for curriculum development for eco-friendly human behavior

  1. KNOWLEDGE BASED STRUCTURE OF RESEARCH AND RESULT

Energy conservation and sustainable behavior and awareness can be increased through an awareness building approach regarding energy saving which should be taught to children from an early age at a time when they still have continuous ongoing development in all skill areas. In particular, in children aged between 7-12 years, their social development will change increasingly from self-centered to group-centered behavior. Accordingly, the child will build a systematic ability to use logical categories to conceptualize their current environment and thrive within it. Moreover, children and youth will be important role models for the nation for energy conservation in the future. Therefore, an important target group of education for energy conservation should be the group of young people who are currently studying in school, especially those in the elementary level because this education level is the basic compulsory education for all students. By Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation for Primary Schools as the researcher designed figure 2.

Figure 2: Animation and games computer design for sustainable energy conservation

The education system assesses students on their knowledge of a balanced curriculum and on their ability to link concepts across subject areas and to apply the skills learned. Standardized tests offer one means of measuring students’ attainment levels. In Japan, the elementary grades run from age 6 to 11, with junior high school from 12 to 14. These nine years comprise the compulsory education in the country, which has a National Curriculum Standards first published in 1947, and modified every ten years thereafter to ensure the subject matter is up to date. The Curriculum Council is responsible for the revisions, under the office of the Minister of Education, Science, Sports and Culture. The National Curriculum must be taught in all schools, and have the basic aim of ensuring that all children receive a balanced education which provides them with the skills required to succeed in a changing society. Researcher have designed Intergrated Curriculum to increase awareness of Energy Conservation for Primary Schools are Animations and Games Computer. As following in Table 1 and 2:

The study of comparison of energy efficiency before and after use Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation of students with lower than 70%. Reseacher considering only the students with the pre-test results. Less than 70% were found in the level 1, students with pre-test scores lower than 70% or 37.53%. The grade 1 students accounted for 35.38%, grade 2 students accounted for 47.76% and grade 3 students accounted for 29.79%

Less than 70% were found in the level 2, students with pre-test scores lower than 70% or 20.56%. The grade 4 students accounted for 20.59%, grade 5 students accounted for 17.36% and grade 6 students accounted for 23.36% respectively. As show table 1:

Table 1: Number and Percentage Students with lower than 70%

Level

Class

n

Score lower than 70%

Frequency

Precent

Level 1

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Over all

130

134

141

405

46

64

42

152

35.38

47.76

29.79

37.53

Level 2

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Over all

102

121

137

360

21

21

32

74

20.59

17.36

23.36

20.56

For students with lower than 70% results in the level 1 and level 2, the results can be compared. Pre-test and post-test by Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation were found every student in every level and every grade. There was a statistically significant difference in the energy saving after school at the .01 level. As following in Table 2:

Table 2: Comparison of energy efficiency before and after use Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation of students with lower than 70%

Level

Class

n

Score

Mean

SD

T

p

Level 1

Grade 1

46

Post test

29.652

0.526

29.708**

0.000

Pre test

15.935

2.894

Grade 2

64

Post test

29.375

1.507

37.444**

0.000

Pre test

17.656

1.845

Grade 3

42

Post test

29.262

1.191

21.346**

0.000

Pre test

17.357

3.252

All Level 1

152

Post test

29.428

1.199

48.543**

0.000

Pre test

17.053

2.711

Level 2

Grade 4

21

Post test

141.238

12.625

17.071**

0.000

Pre test

99.143

2.744

Grade 5

21

Post test

145.381

8.958

22.094**

0.000

Pre test

99.619

2.037

Grade 6

32

Post test

145.906

9.230

26.856**

0.000

Pre test

99.750

2.095

All Level 2

74

Post test

144.432

10.294

38.056**

0.000

Pre test

99.541

2.265

** Statistically Significance at the 0.01

At this research, the researcher considers the percentage difference of energy saving awareness scores. Before and after school by Integrated Curriculum to increase awareness of Energy Conservation. The average and standard deviation are shown in Table 3:

Table 3: Average and Standard Deviation of percentage of awareness energy saving points before and after school by Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation

Class

N

Percent Pre test

Percent Post test

t

P

Mean

SD

Mean

SD

Grade 1

130

70.563

15.675

98.667

2.140

19.894**

0.000

Grade 2

134

67.811

10.310

98.085

3.929

31.601**

0.000

Grade 3

141

71.631

11.482

98.133

3.070

26.914**

0.000

Grade 4

102

77.287

7.798

96.803

5.399

24.201**

0.000

Grade 5

121

77.906

7.293

96.650

5.601

22.327**

0.000

Grade 6

137

77.391

8.245

97.026

6.144

22.833**

0.000

Over all

765

73.558

11.320

97.605

4.611

53.970**

0.000

** Statistically Significance at the 0.01

Table 3: The researcher were found percentage of Enegy awareness score after the study, the statistical significance at 0.01 level, both overall and every year, was show in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Percent Energy awareness rating before and after school

Based on the results of the data analysis by Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation can result in awareness mind saving energy after class change from the previous lesson in level 1 students (Grade 1-3) more than in level 2 students (Grade 4-6) by Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation it is suitable for level 1 students (Grade1-3), Students have a high energy saving score after high school by level 2 students (grade 4-6) there is a difference is slightly in energy awareness scores.

  1. CONCLUSION

Studies investigating how children learn during their early years reveal that their initial experiences have a powerful influence upon their later learning and academic success. It is also important that schools take into account the need to meet the requirements of all their students, and in particular not only to focus on academic needs but also on the social, emotional, physical, and psychological needs which enable children to develop as rounded human beings. Schools therefore have a significant responsibility, and as more is understood about child development, the greater that responsibility becomes, requiring schools to invest more time and resources to deliver high quality education. Furthermore, not all children learn in exactly the same way, and so schools must differentiate in the way lessons are provided in order to meet individual learning needs. For this reason, it is essential to deliver a balanced curriculum so that children’s own personal strengths and weaknesses will be addressed as they develop their skills and knowledge.

Researchers have designed integrated Curricuum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation “Animation and Games Computer” as following figure 4, 5 and 6.

Figure 4: Pre-test and Post-test by Integrated Curriculum to increase Awareness of Energy Conservation

Figure 5: Experimental Groups Level 1 (Grade 1-3)

Figure 5: Experimental Groups Level 2 (Grade 4-6)

The research study is consistent with review of the literature conducted to inform this study confirms that cooperative learning approaches by “animation and games computer” can lead to greater environmental awareness among elementary school children. By working together, children can support each other in striving to achieve the group objective, but to use this method effectively within the classroom requires a skillful teacher who is adept at organizing group activities which fully engage learners and promote participation from everyone involved. Theories of cooperative learning therefore offer a sound structure to examine the development of sustainable energy awareness in the classroom. This framework allows the key concepts from the field of sustainable energy to be applied through social learning techniques which stem from a solid theoretical foundation in education. This research is consistent with Hilal Aktamis sought to investigate the sustainable energy awareness in high school students along with their energy saving habits in order to examine the influence of socio-demographic factors upon energy-saving knowledge and behavior. In this study, a survey is conducted in order to determine the nature of the status quo. There were 400 participants in the study, comprising students from the 6th (162 students), 7th (145 students), and 8th (93 students) grades. Of these students, 191 were male, and 209 were female; 240 were from urban areas and 160 were from rural areas. The assessment scale used in the study for data collection was the “Energy Saving and Energy Awareness Scale” which comprised 21 items covering 4 factors. The reliability of the survey was tested using Cronbach’s alpha, and the co-efficient was found to be 0.80. One way MANOVA analysis was employed to examine the data, using SPSS version 11.5. It was found that the level of energy awareness among high school students was high.

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